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Russia Arctic Military Base: Putin, storing weapons of mass weapons in Arctic ice, reveals bigger than satellite images

Russia Arctic Military Base: Putin, storing weapons of mass weapons in Arctic ice, reveals bigger than satellite images

Russia has greatly increased its military capabilities in the Arctic amid continued tensions from the US. A few days ago, three ballistic missile nuclear submarines of the Russian Navy arrived in the Arctic. The Russian Defense Ministry had informed the world by releasing a video of this. Now a CNN report has revealed that Russia has significantly increased its military buildup in the Arctic.

 

Russia has greatly increased its military capabilities in the Arctic amid continued tensions from the US. A few days ago, three ballistic missile nuclear submarines of the Russian Navy arrived in the Arctic. The Russian Defense Ministry had informed the world by releasing a video of this. Now the CNN report has revealed that Russia has significantly increased its military buildup in the Arctic. Not only this, Russia is also testing new weapons in this area. Russia is also working to secure the northern coast of the Arctic, as well as to open a major shipping route from Asia to Europe. The Russian military weapons watchdog experts have raised particular concerns about the Poseidon 2M39 torpedo. The development of this torpedo is progressing rapidly under the leadership of Russian President Vladimir Putin. In February, Russian Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu described the stage of a test of this torpedo in February. This unmanned stealth torpedo achieves power through a nuclear reactor. By which it can penetrate into enemy territory for long time and gather intelligence. Not only this, nuclear explosives are also involved in it, It can also attack any enemy location. Russian officials say that with the help of this device many megatons of nuclear weapons can be attacked. This can also spread radioactive materials along enemy seabeds, causing radioactive waves emanating the invaded coastline for decades.

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